Childproofing your home | How To Home Podcast #003

Childproofing your home | HTH003

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Transcript

Aaron:
Welcome
to the How to Home Podcast, presented by FilterBuy I’m your host, Aaron Massey,
a DIY home improvement enthusiast and full time content creator running
mrfixitdiy.com alongside me is my cohost Tracy Pendergast, a home and lifestyle
blogger operating her website heytracy.com Each week we cover the real world
ups and downs of owning a home, answer your questions and if we don’t have the
answers we’ll talk to some experts to help you get the most out of your
remodel, repair and home improvement project. Without further ado, let’s start
the show.
Aaron:
My
name is Aaron Massey and welcome back to another episode of the How to Home
Podcast. We are excited to be here. I am joined as always with my cohost Tracy
Pendergast and we are the resident experts today because we are talking about
child proofing and between us we have three kids under the age of four, so we’ve
been through this relatively recently. I’m still kind of going through it, I’m
sure you are as well.
Tracy:
Yup,
and they’re all still alive.
Aaron:
That’s
right.
Tracy:
So
far we are winning.
Aaron:
Winning
with the child proofing game. We are going to be sharing some of our favorite
tips, some of our favorites products as far as child proofing goes and just
talk to you about things that you can do around your home to make sure that you
are keeping your children as safe as possible. I know they can get into
literally everything, so we’re gonna talk about some things that hopefully will
help you out if you are maybe thinking of having kids or you have some very
young children who are getting to be into the age where they are getting into
things like mine is.
Tracy:
Or
you’re babysitting.
Aaron:
Or
maybe you have grandkids and you haven’t had to baby proof your home in a
while.
Tracy:
Actually,
a third of child injuries happen at home. I think that’s where you get in your
comfort zone and don’t think about things that could be potentially hazardous.
We’ll go down the list and give everyone some tips. Also, I think people just
think of childproofing as for like little kids, but there’re childproofing that
extends to older kids than toddlers and we’ll definitely talk about that. Then
obviously you want to be careful with your children around any type of water,
so pool safety is a big one, especially here in southern California as well.
Aaron:
For
sure, so before we get into that, I just want to remind the audience that if
they want to call in and leave us a voicemail at any time for any questions or
tips or any answers that they’re looking for, maybe a little bit of advice on
or questions that they’re looking for a little bit of advice on, sorry. Our
number is 978-709-1040. You can call us 24 hours a day. Just leave us a
voicemail and we’ll do our best to incorporate it in the show or you can email
me at [email protected] If you don’t want to talk on the phone you can leave
me an email as well and we’ll try to touch on some of those.
Aaron:
We
want to take a moment to thank our founding partner of the How to Home Podcast,
which is Filterbuy. They are a direct to consumer HVAC filter manufacturer,
they manufacture all their products right here in the US and they can ship
anywhere in the US within 24 hours, including custom sized filters.
Tracy:
Yup
and you can save 5% when you subscribe, so you just set your size and how often
you want it and you forget it and your filters will just roll on in.
Aaron:
We
have signed up for it in our household and we have two units. All you have to
do is you go on the website, put in your information but I think a lot of
people don’t realize that they should be replacing their air filters typically
every three months, depending on the usage, so we have ours set to deliver
every three months and you never have to remember to change it, you don’t have
to set an alert, you don’t have to do any of that. It just shows up to your
door and then you go, “Oh, I gotta change my filter,” and it’s that simple. It
takes you five minutes to do and it’s really easy to sign up.
Aaron:
You
can save the 5% by subscribing, makes sure you guys go check out bilterbuy.com
Let’s dive into our topic today or childproofing things is something that I am
constantly finding new things. My son now being over a year literally within
the last week or two, is now walking, so it’s a whole new ball game.
Tracy:
Let
the games begin.
Aaron:
Yeah,
as far as what he’s getting into. And, I know you’ve been through this with
your children being.
Tracy:
Yes,
I have a two year old and a three year old. So if it is not nailed down, they
will rip it apart and destroy it. If it is nailed down, they will stand on it,
find something they can rip down higher and destroy it. Toddlers are crazy.
Aaron:
And
then team up with each other and do twice the damage.
Tracy:
They’re
destructive and no respect these kids. Unfortunately, some things that are
dangerous, you don’t even realize until you see something potentially dangerous
happening.
Aaron:
And,
I think we have a little bit of different perspective as far as our approach to
child proofing because for me, lock it up however you can do it, get it out of
the way, make sure they can’t get into it. I don’t care what it looks like.
I’ll slap pool noodles on the bumpers of anything sharp and call it a day. But
for you, I think you like a little bit more of aesthetic, you want to keep it
Homie, right?
Tracy:
Well
you’re about function and I’m so happy for you. That is awesome. I listen, we
can’t have nice things in our house already, right? I have yogurt smeared all
over my couches, I have baby wipes, it’s disgusting. My last shred of dignity
is left in these little corners where you want me to now put gates and plastic
covers and everything else. You can keep your kids really safe but I think
there’s still a way to do it where it’s aesthetically pleasing. You don’t want
to feel like you’re living at a daycare center, right?
Aaron:
Yeah,
I could see that but I think.
Tracy:
You
would have had tennis balls on the corners of your table. You want to do
something that looks kind of nice with your design.
Aaron:
Right,
especially if you have guests over and stuff. You don’t want it to be-
Tracy:
Right.
Aaron:
You
know.
Tracy:
I’m
not petty. I want my kids to be safe. That’s my number one priority but if
there are these products out where you can be safe and your house can still
look nice.
Aaron:
Look
like a home, yeah.
Tracy:
Then
why not?
Aaron:
I’m
excited to hear some of your products because like I said, you’ve been through
this now twice and I’m just getting through some of it now. I’m looking forward
to hearing what your advice is and maybe I can share some of my thoughts with
you as far as what I think works and go from there.
Tracy:
My
first one is actually, you’re gonna think it’s weird because it’s in the safe,
we’re talking about safety but it’s actually a slow closing potty and a
toddler’s seat that is actually in the inside of an adult seat. I’ll tell you
the two reasons why it’s more safe and I’ll also tell you why it helps with the
aesthetic. It helps with aesthetic because it looks like a totally normal
toilet top. It’s an adult toilet top but when you open it in the lid, there’s a
toddler potty that comes down. Safety-wise, you don’t have a potty that’s
rocking back and forth where your child can potentially fall, which did happen
to my son and it’s a lot more sanitary because your child is going right into
the potty and then also, I have a little boy. Oh man, you have a little boy.
Aaron:
Mm-hmm
(affirmative).
Tracy:
So
many things regarding their, it’s going to be magical for you let me tell you.
When they’re standing and they really like to push their limits with distance
and aim but I’m sure you know that you’re a man.
Aaron:
Yup.
Tracy:
You
don’t want a potty that could potentially fall down quickly onto them. It’s
super dangerous. They could get really hurt. These potties, they’re Bemis the
brand that … and we’ll link it in the show notes. They’re Bemis, they’re slow
close. You take out the whole potential of them falling off, you take out the
anti-sanitary part and then also you protect their body parts you don’t want
that lid closing down on them.
Aaron:
Does
it have any kind of … so my son right now, he’s big into … anytime we’re in
the bathroom trying to get ready for bath time or whatever. He’s walking
around, he immediately tries to go over to the toilet and lift the toilet seat
up and reach down in there, which of course is disgusting. Does it latch down
as well or?
Tracy:
The
Bemis one does not but you can buy, they basically just look like little side
clamps and you can attach them and they’ll lock into place. That’s a separate
thing but you can just grab those on Amazon or Home Depot.
Aaron:
Yeah,
I’m thinking about throwing one of those on there because he immediately tries
to go for it like a dog drinking out of the toilet and I’m like, “No, let’s not
do that right now.”
Tracy:
No.
Well, if he does have an interest because you do forget to re-latch things, I
would definitely suggest just getting the slow close potty now and then it’s
just there when you’re ready and when kids come over it’s great. People are
always like, “You’re awesome, you have a kid potty.”
Aaron:
People
don’t have to bring their kids over and bring their own toilet and all that.
Tracy:
Things
I never thought I’d be proud of in my 20s.
Aaron:
I
know, right, yeah.
Tracy:
Another
one I have is the hiccapop foam bed bumpers, so you’ve seen the gate, the bed
rails that go on the sides of the beds.
Aaron:
Yeah,
kind of they’re open on the foot end kind of thing, so they can’t roll out.
Tracy:
Exactly,
so these would be for a little bit of older children that are not … that are
like walking, climbing, my three year old. You put it under the sheets, so when
you make the bed you can’t even see it. It’s basically like a bowling bumper
rail. It’s a bumper rail, you put it under the sheets, it has like grip and
when they like roll over in the middle of the night, they kind of feel the lip
and then they don’t fall out of bed. They’re really great.
Tracy:
My
other one, my husband thought I was crazy when they arrived. They are LED
nightlights for the bedroom and they’re red and they produce melatonin. Okay.
So you don’t want your … eventually your child will wake up in the middle of
the night, especially when they’re potty trained and get up in the dark. You don’t
want them … They need a nightlight in there but white light will disrupt
sleep, blue light disrupts sleep. You want something that makes everything
visible in the room and protects them from falling into something potentially
hazardous but doesn’t disrupt their sleep because let’s face it, we’re not
getting any sleep and anything that disrupts my sleep more, I am going to throw
in the trash besides my job. I really, really like these night lights. They’re
on Amazon and again they are called Sleep Aid Red LED Night Lights.
Aaron:
They’re
on all the time, they don’t?
Tracy:
No,
they actually they have sensors, so when it’s dark they pop on and then my last
one is, they’re the clear corner protectors. Obviously, as much as we want to
keep our counters and our tables, the integrity of them, my kids are like right
at the age where they will walk right into corners. These ones are clear,
they’re made of medical grade plastic and they’re rounded, so if any little
heads go into the corners they are completely safe, but they’re virtually
invisible, they’re clear.
Aaron:
I
really like those as well. I have some similar ones on my list of products that
I really love but mine are, they’re not clear versions, they’re like padded
kind of … They’re brown most of them and you can get them in different colors
because like I have a coffee table that I put them on for example and the
coffee tables brown, so I just-
Tracy:
So,
they match?
Aaron:
Yeah,
they match it fine but again, I’m not opposed to throwing a pool noodle on the
… slicing a pool noodle down the middle and wrapping it around the table
either but it’s an aesthetic thing.
Tracy:
And,
I think you go through a phase where you’re okay making those like really
obvious safety rigs for your kids where the whole house can look like it’s a
daycare center but eventually you want to evolve out of that. As you’re getting
rid of baby gear, you want your house to become a more mature home again and
that’s when I suggest these products for sure.
Aaron:
On
my list, I’ve got a bunch of stuff. As far as the cabinet latches and stuff
goes, which there’s a ton of products out there as far as cabinet latches go.
And my son, that’s his new thing, he wants to be opening up every cabinet all
the time and I originally bought these ones that are, they stick on, they open
the cabinet slightly and then you depress the thing on the top and it latches
inside of the cabinet, so from the outside.
Tracy:
And
then your cuticle stays inside and then?
Aaron:
Yeah.
From the outside they look normal, you have normal looking cabinets but I hate
them. So far, I have not found ones that I like from that perspective. Those
ones, they peel off super easy. My son pulls on him hard enough and the
adhesive pops right off. I bought them on Amazon. I’ll link to the ones not to
buy because those are the ones that I have, but I do like these ones and I
think they’re made by a company called Munchkin and they’re just straps.
They’re kind of general purpose adhesive straps and they go on the face of a
cabinet or I have them on a bunch of different things. I have one actually on
my dishwasher as well because that dishwasher door, he’s now tall enough to
grab the handle and then pull the dishwasher door right down onto himself and
kind of crush himself under the dishwasher door, which is a little heavy.
Tracy:
Or,
grab knives out of the inside like my daughter.
Aaron:
Yeah,
grab anything or even just dirty plates and dishes and grossness. I put one on
there and they’re great. They’re adhesive back, you depress the sides of them
and they kind of latch over this little knob inside and you can unlatch them
either way and they’re versatile, you can use them on, like I said, you can use
them on cabinets, you can use them on doors, you can use them on drawers
whatever. I really like those. Those are probably my favorite of all the
products that we’ve used thus far. And then obviously, a big issue is you don’t
want your kids getting into electricity or anything like that, putting stuff in
the outlets.
Aaron:
There’s
always the obvious, I guess, or somewhat obvious outlet plugs. You’ve seen them
probably since the ’80s or whatever. Just the plastic inserts that go into the
outlets. I don’t know what it is about kids that they get so attracted to
anything that they shouldn’t be, that they go straight to it and we’ve put
these little plastic inserts on all the outlets and they’re 99 cents for a 20
pack or something like that super affordable, very cheap and easy to install.
So I love those.
Tracy:
One
day my son told me that the wall bit him. I said, “What did you do to the wall
to make it bite you?” He’s like, “I stuck my finger in a wall and it bit me.” I
was like, “Oh, you’re lucky to be alive.”
Aaron:
I
have a carbon monoxide detector plugged in and it’s kind of right outside his
door and oh my goodness. He goes for it every time. It’s like-
Tracy:
Because
he wants to destroy the thing that is protecting him and keeping him safe.
That’s how they work.
Aaron:
Yeah,
if he ever hit the alarm button on it to test it. Oh my God, he would go
bananas like he would just, because it’s so loud. I remember I set it off to
test it one day. Oh my God. It was like the most obnoxious sound you’ve ever
heard. I really like those products and the other thing that I’ve recently
gotten into is these anti-tip straps. I’ve heard about them a bunch of times
but I didn’t really see the benefit of them necessarily or whatever but
recently, my son has … anytime I’m changing him he likes to reach into the
drawers and grab the clothes out and now that he’s standing and walking,
there’s multiple drawers open at the same time on the dressers and he’s
grabbing on and pulling on the dresser drawers like towards him.
Aaron:
Once
the drawers are extended and the weight of the closet is in the front of the
dresser, well it’s top heavy or front heavy right and it’d tip over and crush
him. The anti-tip straps, you attach them to the wall, they’re super easy. You
just kind of screw them in to a stud, hopefully you can get a stud or use a
wall anchor of some kind and drill a hole in. You can’t really see them if you
put them behind the dresser or the cabinet or whatever it is that you’re trying
to secure but they work great and-
Tracy:
Can
you use them on tv too?
Aaron:
You
can use them on TVs, you can use them on any big appliances that you’re worried
about tipping over or … they’re pretty versatile as far as what they can be
attached to. I really recommend those. That’s probably my four or five favorite
products that I’ve used thus far but again, I’m kind of just starting to get
into some of these things now that my son is walking. The one other thing that
I do really like is we have pretty much hardwood floors throughout, so we use
the kind of the puzzle piece style foam floor blocks.
Tracy:
Foam
mats.
Aaron:
Foam
mats. I love them because now they have a lot of different, speaking to your
point as far as aesthetically going, they have a lot of different looks on
them. You don’t have to just get the traditional kind of letter ones.
Tracy:
Right,
you can get them to look like Persian rugs now to, it’s amazing.
Aaron:
If
you want something that provides the safety of the kid falling on the hardwood
floor, bonking their head or whatever, you can get them now to look, yeah, like
what you’re saying. Like a Persian rug or match your flooring or whatever,
there’s all kinds of patterns and looks, so your house doesn’t look like a
daycare. But I really liked those because he’s falling a lot and so, any play
area we can easily outfit with the foam mats and two, you don’t realize how
much time you spend on the floor playing with them and stuff so your knees,
your elbows.
Tracy:
Getting
up is the hard part.
Aaron:
Everything.
So you’re constantly on the floor playing with them, so anything you can use
those floor mats for saves your joints and muscles and all the body aches that
comes with getting older.
Tracy:
The
conversations you just didn’t think you’d have.
Aaron:
Yeah.
Tracy:
I
actually have a list from the CDC of different zones in your house where
there’re the most potential hazards and I thought maybe we could run down them
and talk about any other products that might be good. The first one is water,
so in the bathroom, kitchen, swimming pools, hot tubs. One thing I really love
for the bathtub is the cover for the spout and mine also has a temperature reading
and it will blink red if the water’s too hot so sometimes … I shouldn’t be
saying this but my kid’s room is right next to the bathroom, so I’ll just go
grab their pajamas and come right back in sometimes.
Tracy:
I
know that if one of them pulled the spout while I was gone and it started
getting hot, I would hear an alert and things happen in 15 seconds, so I really
do like that. The heat sensor and it covers the spout so they can’t hit their
head.
Aaron:
Yeah,
speaking of bath time, we had something similar. That was really great for
that. We had kind of this like rubber duck inflatable mini-bathtub for when he
was very small, so you don’t have to use the entire tub kind of thing.
Actually, the bottom of it has a heat sensor in it, so if the water-
Tracy:
Which
turns color.
Aaron:
Yeah,
it changes to a different color. If the water got too hot or above the
recommended temperature for an infant, it would change color. There were
several times where I filled the water up and I’m thinking, “This water is
totally fine temperature wise for me,” but then you’re like, “Oh it’s a little
probably too hot for a baby, for baby skin.” Something you don’t really think
about that I thought that was a great product and then also now, now that we’ve
kind of aged out of that. One thing that we really like is an insert to put in
the bottom of the tub that is like they’re like the adhesive gel things.
Tracy:
Slip
free.
Aaron:
Yeah,
the slip free mats to go in the bottom of the tub because you don’t realize how
top heavy kids are especially in the bathtub and they just slip and it just
takes one second for them to slip. Even when you have your hands on them,
they’re soapy and stuff, they slip and boom, smack their teeth, their baby
teeth and it turns into a nightmare.
Tracy:
It’s
on your watch, the mom’s mad then no one’s happy.
Aaron:
We’ve
covered some water but also pool is obviously a huge thing. There’s a whole
another, we could get into pool safety all in its own and maybe we will down
the line but obviously, you want to fence off the area as much as possible.
Make sure it’s a secure latch, childproof latch of some kind on your fence so
that your kids and their friends and everybody else can’t get to it but that’s
a whole another thing but.
Tracy:
Yeah,
and that stuff happens fast.
Aaron:
And,
you do have the pool alert things now as well where they kind of, anything that
breaks the surface tension of the water, it will set off an alarm either in the
house or on your phone that at least you know if something falls in your pool,
whether it’s an animal or a kid or.
Tracy:
Right,
and I want to share because I want parents to understand how I consider myself
a very attentive mom but how quickly things can happen. My son does swim
lessons, he knows that he cannot swim without floaties or I thought he knew
that. We were in the Cayman Islands this last summer and I told Max, “You stand
right here on the step, while I turn around and I’m gonna put the floaties on
Sammy. And literally, five seconds. I turned around and I’m putting the
floaties on Sammy and I turn back around and he’s like this like drowning. And,
it was the scariest thing I actually like I thought maybe he dry downed, like
there’s water in his lungs. It happens so fast, probably in five seconds.
Tracy:
I
asked him later, “Did you fall in, what happened?” And he said he’s used to
having his floaties, he said, “I just stepped in and I couldn’t swim,” so these
things happen really fast, it’s not just some moms or dads that are not
attentive to their kids and it’s just always thinking like a toddler and being
one step ahead of it because unfortunately.
Aaron:
Yeah,
stuff happens.
Tracy:
Yeah
and it happens fast. Heat or flames, so the kitchen, fireplace and grill, those
knob covers are awesome. If you have an oven like I do where they could turn
knobs.
Aaron:
One
thing that is an easy thing that you can do if you have like a wood burning
fireplace for example. A lot of times everybody has the tools sitting right
next to the fireplace. You will not be able to have that. The kid will try to
grab those rod iron tools in a second and impale themselves with them. Second
thing find yourself a grate of some kind. They have decorative ones, they have
all sorts of different options that you can cover the fireplace with to keep
them one, from climbing in the ash.
Aaron:
If
you have even a clean fireplace, you’re always gonna get that black mark on you
if it’s a wood burning fireplace and even if it’s a gas one on that side of
things. The keys for the gas starters, the little things that you put into the
floor wherever the valve is to turn the gas on. Make sure you’re keeping that
key separate. I keep it up on the mantel up above where the fireplace is.
Tracy:
Well,
I always think about it. We buy our kids these keys to work on their fine
motors and those latch boards where we teach them how to unlock every sort of
latch. What are we teaching our children?
Aaron:
We’re
teaching them how to sabotage everything that we’re doing.
Tracy:
Like
how to put the fire starter into the and like turn it. We are training them to
do these things.
Aaron:
The
knob covers are great. They also have the door knob ones. Those work really
well. Fortunately for me right now my son is not tall enough to reach all of
that stuff, so I haven’t had to go down that route yet. I’m very surprised how
smart he is already in that sense, where he’s constantly trying to open the
cabinet and he, for those latches that I was telling you I don’t like because
he can actually yank the cabinet open if he pulls hard enough. He actually
realizes where the latch is and he’s trying to solve it.
Tracy:
Yeah,
they figure it out quick.
Aaron:
And,
he did the same thing on an … I just recently fenced off the backyard and I
put a gate on there to keep him from falling in an area and the other day he
was standing up holding on to both, onto the fence and just shaking it. He knew
it was the gate and then he’s like, looks up and he sees the latch for where
the thing is latched and he’s reaching up trying to undo it. I’m like, “Slow
down dude, you just started standing up like you just started walking. Let’s
not figure out the latch. Okay. Give me like two weeks at least before you
start figuring out how to undo everything. I’m trying to stop you from doing.”
Tracy:
At
two and three, all of our baby gates just got removed because they’re obsolete
now. They know how to open all of them or the big one will open it for the
little one and laugh and run away and frame her. Next is, I think everyone kind
of considers this the toxic substances. We’re talking kitchen sink, medicine
cabinet, garage, shed, the purse where medications are stored. I think it’s
just keeping all of that way out of reach for me. Our cleaning supplies,
everything is up high or in a locked cabinet.
Aaron:
We
kind of are the stereotype. I think we keep all the cleaning supplies right
under the sink where I think a lot of people do.
Tracy:
The
basic.
Aaron:
Yeah,
cabinet straps and the other stuff and that’s a great idea to put stuff up
high. Anything that is dangerous, I mean put it up as high as you can get it
top shelves of the cabinets whatever, so they can’t get into it as much as
possible. But the other thing is garages. I keep a lot of highly toxic stuff in
my garage, which maybe you wouldn’t necessarily consider keeping a lid on but I
have a deadbolt on because I have an attached garage. The garage is attached to
the house. I keep a dead bolt actually closed from the inside, so he can’t get
out of sight for five minutes and end up in the garage with power tools and
toxins and everything.
Tracy:
Yeah
and like even something as small as ant spray or snail bait. These things are
just so toxic and dangerous to our kids. That’s a really good idea. Our shed is
locked as well. The last one is potential for fall stairs, slippery floors, high
windows, tipping furniture we touched on a lot of that. One thing I am seeing
now is a trend that I really like for stairways is the clear, it’s like
plexiglass like [inaudible 00:26:49] plexiglass. It’s down railing so that you
can still see through it and you can still enjoy your staircase but kids can’t
put their limbs or head in between the bars.
Aaron:
I
see what you’re saying, okay. It runs down the railing, okay. I thought you
meant at the top like it’s a clear gate or something.
Tracy:
No,
we have a gate at the top and the bottom but it’s starting to not do us much
good.
Aaron:
Yeah,
we have a (silence) mostly it’s the exterior stuff fencing, gating, putting stuff
at the top of stairs to keep the kids from tumbling down. I mean that’s where
we’re spending the most of our effort right now because we don’t have the
stairs on the inside but I know the baby gates, those are easy things to
install and go up in a few minutes. You can get them on-
Tracy:
And,
they make great looking baby gates now.
Aaron:
Yeah,
and you can get them on Amazon, you can get them on … you can’t get them at
Babies R Us anymore but you can get them at Target or Costco or any of those
types of places, so plenty of options as far as that stuff goes. There’s
certainly a lot of things to consider when baby proofing your house under
normal circumstances but if you’re like me or currently you, you’re also your
house may be going through some remodel projects at the same time.
Aaron:
I
constantly have projects going on in the house, so baby proofing and child
proofing the home under remodel conditions is different, I guess. I just wanted
to touch on a few things that you can possibly do to try and keep yourself and
your family as safe as possible while doing a remodel. Because I understand
that to-do lists don’t stop just because you have a kid.
Tracy:
Right
and the majority of people can’t afford to move out of their home during a
remodel, I know, we’re all living at home through ours.
Aaron:
Why
don’t you talk a little bit about yours. You’re going through a huge project
right now and how are you actively working to keep your home and your kids safe
while that’s going on?
Tracy:
I
think the first thing if you’re working with a contractor is just stressing how
important containment is to you. We talked to the demo crew last week and you
feel kind of weird telling grown men this about like a job at your house, but
it’s important to me that things are blocked off and contained. I think that
whether you’re doing it yourself or you have people coming in, it’s having
areas that are specifically designated to work and making sure that those areas
are safe.
Tracy:
Like
not having a drill on a ladder where it could fall, keeping everything just
super tight and one thing that concerns me not to skip around but is air
quality, paint and dust. It’s keeping that stuff contained as well and also
running constant filters at our house. I wish I knew a place to get a filter.
Aaron:
I
know, right.
Tracy:
Can
you think of one?
Aaron:
Yeah,
I can think of a place it’s called FilterBuy. They’re a proud sponsor of the
How to Home Podcast.
Tracy:
Made
in the USA.
Aaron:
They’re
made right here in the USA and I highly recommend that you guys check out
filterbuy.com to get your air filters for your remodel projects. I change them
out all the time. To that point though, you’re 100% dead on with the
containment. What it requires to live and work in a house under construction
whether or not you have kids is containment. You have to contain the work to
the area that it’s in or otherwise you are … either you’re putting yourself
or your family in danger and you’re putting your own sanity at risk because
when stuff carries over from the work area to your living area and you can’t
get away from it, it’s just too much.
Tracy:
Well,
I think sanity left the building a long time ago.
Aaron:
Yeah,
well what I think your best friend is obviously plastics like four to six mil
plastics, which are a little bit thicker, on the heavier duty side. It’s easy,
especially if you’re … if you’re doing stuff on your own, there’s a company
that I’ve worked with in the past and full disclosure, they’ve sponsored some
videos of mine, so I’ve done dust containment videos, which you guys find on my
website or on my YouTube channel. There’s a company called Trimaco and they
sell dust containment poles is what they are and they allow you to build
basically a temporary plastic wall that you can put anywhere. You could put it
up to 14 feet tall or something.
Aaron:
They
fit the majority of applications and you can just build a temporary wall and
even if you don’t have those poles, which I understand can be a little bit
expensive, it’s very easy to build a two by four frame and staple the plastic
all around it. Build yourself legitimate rooms/walls and contain the project
that way. Any place you have an entry point or an exit point, wherever you have
a crew or workers going in and out, use what’s called a dust containment door.
They’re plastic doors that go up, they zip up and down and make sure whoever’s
using it, whether it’s yourself or your contractors or maybe you’ve got some
help that’s just helping you out. You got to be religious about using it. Don’t
leave it open because dust and fumes and everything like that, especially if
you have kids.
Tracy:
It’s
so fine.
Aaron:
It
goes like there nothing finer than drywall dust that it will go anywhere that
you let it and talking about the air filtration thing. You have to cover those
events, cover those air returns, cover all those things that are pulling all of
that stuff into the rest of the home. You want to make sure that you’re creating
kind of fully contained area where you are keeping everything whether it’s good
or bad in that space and that way you’re maximizing the potential to keep your
kids and family safe because it’s hard. It’s already hard enough to live in a
place that you’re working on. Adding a kid makes it another, a whole level, a
whole extra level and then-
Tracy:
And
the things you can’t see like potential fumes are the things that scare me the
most. I know how to contain tools and materials but I … That air quality is a
big one, especially for little kids and one thing we did to make our tool
system safer. It used to be that tools would come in from the shed and then
just get set on top of things during projects and then never make their way
back out. What we did is we got a whole bunch of the tubs that the handles come
up and lock and we made a painting bin, the drill with all the drill bits bin,
we put different project similar tools together.
Aaron:
So
they can be contained while the project is going without having to take them in
and out of the workspace [crosstalk 00:33:35].
Tracy:
You
bring them all in together, you use what you need, you close it and you lock it
and you bring them all back out and that’s really, really helped.
Aaron:
Yeah,
that’s a good tip and it allows you to keep the job site clean too at the end
of every day. Even if you keep them in the room, at least you can put the tools
in the bin, latch them, stack them, whatever into the corner and then the next
day they’re there and you don’t have tools lying all over the place. And then,
keep your kids out of those work areas obviously. You don’t want to risk
anything or them getting exposed to anything that maybe isn’t that potentially
harmful for an adult but as an infant or a toddler, it can be a little bit more
detrimental. There’s ways certainly to protect your kids as much as possible.
The idea is to minimize risk, right? Stuff happens all the time, stuff happens
every day. You do your best to try and childproof and baby proof but nothing is
100% but you try and cover all your bases and check all your boxes.
Tracy:
You
just do a walkthrough of your home, you crawl on the floor, you walk around,
you slide hands around and you just find room by room everything that’s
potentially dangerous, write it down and knock it all out. Go get the stuff and
knock it out because it’s all this stuff is really easy.
Aaron:
Yeah,
and I think don’t overwhelm yourself with it. You can obviously do all the
things that we’re talking about but at the same time, there will be things that
come up along the way that you’re like, “Oh, I didn’t realize he could get into
this,” or, “I didn’t realize that she would do that or whatever.” If you’re an
attentive parent then you’ll see it, you’ll acknowledge it, you’ll make the
changes. It’s part of the fun, you realize all the things they get into that you
didn’t think they would.
Tracy:
Do
you have any stories yet? Have you had any like near death? “Oh my gosh, my
child.”
Aaron:
The
slipping in the bathtub thing, we did have happen. That was a little scary at
first but I’ve caught him, I’ve caught him a lot of times so far. It’s amazing
the reflexes you develop, you’re like a cat, you’re like [inaudible 00:35:31].
He likes to try and dive head first off the bed. Sometimes, occasionally, we’ll
let them come up on the bed with us just like in the morning or whatever. If my
wife brings him in, his waking him up or waking me up if I’m sleeping in until
8:00 a.m.
Tracy:
Let
me warn you, they all fall out of the bed at some point and you’ll feel so bad.
Aaron:
Well,
it’s our bed but-
Tracy:
No,
like it was our bed both times. It’s so fast like-
Aaron:
Well
the one day, he was just sitting there like, “I’m having a great time,” and
then he just like [inaudible 00:36:03] and he just jumped like he’s gonna dive
head first off the bed. And I’m like, “Nope.,” and I just caught him,
thankfully, but I was like, “Oh my God, what are you doing you crazy man?” He’s
pretty tame right now like it’s early. He’s only just started walking, I think
in the next week or two we’re gonna have a whole new ball of wax but I’m sure
you have plenty of stories between your two.
Tracy:
I
mean, my kids are both absolutely insane. The most recent because I can’t even
… it’s the only way I can narrow it down. The most recent was, I have a
little bin of like essential oils because I diffuse them and I do not know how
but it’s always in the two seconds you blink. My daughter got ahold of the rose
essential oil. I don’t even know why I had a rose and opened it and dumped it
all over my couch and our house smelled like old, like golden girls, like old
lady for like a month. I could not get rid of it. I washed cushions. It just
smelled like worst. That was probably of the least pleasant ones. Our whole
house smell like rose, fake like rose.
Aaron:
I
don’t even know what fake rose smells like.
Tracy:
Horrible.
Have a whole bunch of church ladies ever hugged you at once?
Aaron:
No.
Tracy:
That’s
what it smells like.
Aaron:
Okay,
one thing we didn’t touch on obviously is firearms, right? If you have firearms
at home, I know there’s probably a lot of our audience might have firearms at
home and stuff. It’s a whole another thing. Make sure you keep those locked up.
I think obviously for any age kids make sure you keep them in a safe and
however you choose to do it.
Tracy:
Also
to that point as a parent, it is okay and you never should feel uncomfortable
before you drop your child off to anyone’s house to have that conversation with
the parent. Do you own a firearm? Is it locked up? And that’s like, it’s very
important and a good conversation to have before you leave your child at
anyone’s home and it’s a relevant conversation right now and it’s like the
world’s scary.
Aaron:
And,
medicine cabinets to that degree. Whether or not your kids are three or 15, is
your medicine cabinet locked up and all that type of stuff. Make sure the
prescriptions are locked up and ultimately, yeah, you at some point it’s the
kid has friends and stuff. You got to have that relationship with your
children’s friends parents your-
Tracy:
And
even your family.
Aaron:
And
family too, yeah. Just make sure that everything is locked up and I think a lot
of times even for grandparents. They are long past the age of having kids
around all the time, so just making sure that the house that you’re dropping
them off at, if it’s not a daycare center that they’re outfitted to handle the
kid as well and make sure that they’re safe there. Well, we hope this episode
was helpful for you guys and hopefully you got some tips in as far as how to
baby proof your home. If you have any questions please call us. Let us know if
you have any. I know it can be a little bit overwhelming. I was a little
overwhelmed at first like this whole thing. Yeah, it’s all-new.
Tracy:
Right,
also to that. I’d love to hear if anyone has products they love, maybe you can
hit us up and give us recommendations that we can feature.
Aaron:
Yeah,
so follow us on social media, if you’re not already. We’ll put links in the
show notes or you can always reach us via voicemail at 978-709-1040 or you can
always email me at [email protected] and we hope you guys enjoyed this
episode. If you did, please rate it on your various podcast listening apps or
if you’re choosing to watch it, hit that like button.
Aaron:
Thank
you to FilterBuy for making this episode possible. If you guys are in the
market for HVAC filters, which you should be even if you live in an apartment.
Make sure you check out filterbuy.com and if you guys want to check out any of
the child proofing products that we’ve talked about in today’s episode, make
sure you check out the links in the show notes and we will be back next week
with an all-new episode, so make sure you guys stick around. Thank you so much
for watching. We’ll see you next time.
Aaron:
The
How to Home Podcast is brought to you by filterbuy.com your one stop direct to
consumer replacement air filter brand and is produced in collaboration by Mass
Media Group LLC and Intelligent Arts and Artists. The show is executive
produced by Georgia Louise and Aaron Massey.

Show Notes

Aaron and Tracy share their best tips to childproof your home!

LET’S CHAT!

You can always call and leave your questions and comments on our voicemail!

978-709-1040

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR FILTERBUY!

FILTERBUY.COM

AARON MENTIONED:

BROWN PADDED FURNITURE PROTECTORS – https://amzn.to/2Uywv9l

CABINET LATCHES- https://amzn.to/2Sg2woT

MUNCHKIN ADHESIVE STRAPS- https://amzn.to/2MGCrKr

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SLIP FREE MAT- https://amzn.to/2UvubzE

FIREPLACE SAFETY- https://amzn.to/2SgbWAP

TRACY MENTIONED:

BEMIS TOILET SEAT- https://amzn.to/2WxdXbe

TOILET SEAT LATCHES- https://amzn.to/2D0WQFE

FOAM BED BUMPERS-  https://amzn.to/2MHcBpM

SLEEP AID RED NIGHT LIGHTS- https://amzn.to/2UrHmle

CLEAR CORNER PROTECTORS – https://amzn.to/2MF7Ywm

SPOUT COVER WITH TEMPERATURE READING- https://amzn.to/2Ut95Sz

TRACY ALSO USES THIS SPOUT COVER- https://amzn.to/2TksIfj

KNOB COVERS- https://amzn.to/2TtEioR

CLEAR PLEXIGLASS RAILINGS- https://amzn.to/2CV0T6E

CHILD-PROOFING DURING REMODEL:

Containment is key!

Be mindful of air quality- dust containment walls and zippered doors. Seal off air intakes.

Keep tools out of reach and make sure bulky equipment and ladders aren’t just propped against walls where kids can pull them down.

WE LOVE TO HEAR WHAT YOU’RE DIGGING! SHARE YOUR FAVORITE PRODUCTS WITH US VIA OUR PHONE LINE OR SOCIAL MEDIA

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